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Reminiscences and Documents Relating to the Civil War During the Year 1865 Volume 1 John Archibald Campbell

Reminiscences and Documents Relating to the Civil War During the Year 1865 Volume 1

John Archibald Campbell

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230384702
Paperback
22 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1887 edition. Excerpt: ... (2). Memorandum Of The Conversation At The ConFerence In Hampton Koads. The conference was opened by some conversation between Mr. Stevens and President Lincoln relative to their connection as members of a committee or association to promote the election of General Taylor as President in 1848. The composition of the association, the fate of different members (Truman Smith and Mr. Toombs and others)--the time that the parties had served in Congress together, when Mr. Hunter and Mr. Seward became members of the Senate, and other personal incidents were alluded to. After this the parties approached the subject of the conference. At a very early stage in the conversation Mr. Lincoln announced with some emphasis that until the National authority be recognized within the Confederate States, that no consideration of any other terms or conditions could take place. Mr. Stephens then suggested if there might not be some plan devised by which that question could be adjourned, and to let its settlement await the calm that would occur in the passions and irritations that the war had created. That it was important to divert the public mind from the present quarrel to some matters to which the parties had a common feeling and interest, and mentioned the condition of Mexico as affording such an opportunity. Mr. Lincoln answered-that the settlement of the existing difficulties was of supreme importance, and that he was not disposed to entertain any proposition for an armistice or cessation of hostilities until they were determined by the re-establishment of the National authority over the United States--that he had considered the question of an armistice fully--he would not consent to a proposition of the kind. Mr. Campbell asked in what manner was...