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A Day Without Yesterday Frédéric Roux

A Day Without Yesterday

Frédéric Roux

Published July 29th 2015
ISBN :
ebook
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 About the Book 

Set against a backdrop of a pristine southern Cape beach and the magnificent Scottish Highlands, and immersed in religio-historicity this is a psychosomatic story of deep religious convictions, tragedy, love, compassion, and of faith. The life ofMoreSet against a backdrop of a pristine southern Cape beach and the magnificent Scottish Highlands, and immersed in religio-historicity this is a psychosomatic story of deep religious convictions, tragedy, love, compassion, and of faith. The life of William Murray is turned upside down the night of the cold fire – his bedridden wife passes away and his faithful dog is cruelly slain.Dorothy Sutherland, the woman from Scotland whom he met on the beach and who had awoken in him a new interest in life with her fascinating tales of Scotland has vanished like the smoke of the devastating fire- and the man she claimed was her invalid husband dies in the fire. But it transpires the charred body was not that of the man she claimed, that he was murdered, and, even more perplexing, the police find no vestige of a Dorothy.Our concept of the universe is limited by what cosmologists describe as the horizon scale, the distance that light has travelled since the origin of the universe (the Big Bang, 14 billion years ago). The Big Bang theory is the creation of Georges Lemaître (1894-1966), a Belgian mathematician and Catholic priest. According to his theory the explosion took place a day without yesterday that resulted in the separation of space and time. Out of chaos, an amorphous foam of ultra-high energy where space and time are inseparable, or so the big bang theory contends, explosive bubbles of space-time erupt, each bubble a new universe that bursts into existence – in the beginning God created the heaven and earth – splitting space and time to inflate in a fraction of a second from a pinhead to the size of our observable universe.William is a fourth generation Afrikaner of Scottish origin and a retired minister of the Dutch Reformed Church, a shy and modest man going on sixty. Having lost what was dearest to him he travels to the Highlands to search for Dorothy where he experiences a day without yesterday when he meets Eilidh, Dorothy’s Gaelic-speaking identical twin sister. However, his pious traditions soon falter when he cannot distinguish which twin is in bed with him- when he is drawn into the web of a centuries’ old conflict between the Scots and the English- when a mystical Druid confronts and tells him his grandson will one-day see the return of the Stane (ancients have a saying … where lies the Stane, from there Scotland will be governed, for the Stane is the soul of Scotland)- and when he becomes inspired by the views of Alex Ferguson minister of the local Presbytery.Steeped in Celtic and Druidic lore, Alex represents Christian forces who believe in the need for the Church to change, and who are doing something about it, whereas the retired William is set in his Calvinist ways of Biblical faith and conviction. William is nevertheless taken on a fascinating journey through space and time that tosses his religious beliefs about like a maelstrom. He also learns how the Celts and Druids did not just believe in an Earth Mother, or Mother Goddess, they were in total harmony with this cosmic deity, and with Nature. To them Earth was a living being and we only have life because Earth gives us life. Reminiscent thereof is a letter Galileo wrote to the Grand Duchess of Tuscany in 1615, wherein he said God wrote two books: first the Bible, wherein man finds answers to his questions on values and morals- and the second is the Book of Nature that allows man to use observation and experimentation to answer his questions about the universe.Tragedy made William to go to the Highlands to search for Dorothy and tragedy forces him to return home. But will he still be the same towards his children, friends, and, as important, his Church? And when he resumes his daily walk on the Betty’s Bay beach does he still think of Dorothy?‘Who kenn’d whare lies the Stane, thocht I-Och aye, in the Hi’lands o’ AlbaWhilk is whare lies me ain sowl too, thocht I-Och aye, in the Hi’lands o’ Alba.’