Home » The Dark Would Volume Two: a language art anthology by Philip Davenport
The Dark Would Volume Two: a language art anthology Philip Davenport

The Dark Would Volume Two: a language art anthology

Philip Davenport

Published March 2nd 2016
ISBN :
1004 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

A pioneering virtual anthology of text artists and poets. THE DARK WOULD gathers works by - and interviews with - over 100 contributors including some of the most noted artists and poets alive today: Richard Long, Jenny Holzer, Kenneth Goldsmith,... MoreA pioneering virtual anthology of text artists and poets. THE DARK WOULD gathers works by - and interviews with - over 100 contributors including some of the most noted artists and poets alive today: Richard Long, Jenny Holzer, Kenneth Goldsmith, Fiona Banner, Maggie O Sullivan, Tacita Dean, Tom Phillips, Tom Raworth, Nja Mahdaoui, Lawrence Weiner, Susan Hiller, Tsang Kin-Wah, Charles Bernstein and many, many more, with emerging and “outsider” practitioners. 
 
This is a moment in time when poets and many artists share the same primary material: language. Conceptual art, vispo, text art, outsider art, conceptual poetry, flarf, concrete poetry, live art, L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E, sound scores... THE DARK WOULD is a compelling document, alchemising text into art into text.This virtual volume of over 1000 pages includes hundreds of images and text works, photographs of the two 2013-14 exhibitions connected to the anthology and much more. 40 interviews and essays bring a diverse range of insights - Erica Baum, Charles Bernstein, Kenneth Goldsmith, Tony Lopez writing on Ian Hamilton Finlay, Carol Watts on Richard Long… With additional working notes, drawings, extended commissioned works, all refractions of mortality and the human trace in time.As Editor Philip Davenport writes: “THE DARK WOULD asks what it is to live in a body now, knowing that one day we won’t be here. Perhaps this is best done by people for whom language is a state of between-ness. Here, the material of language is used as a metaphor for human material, our own bodies. Whether poets or homeless people, outsiders or art stars - we all have to find our way through the dark.”