Home » Strange Days: The Adventures of a Grumpy Rock n Roll Journalist in Los Angeles by Dean Goodman
Strange Days: The Adventures of a Grumpy Rock n Roll Journalist in Los Angeles Dean  Goodman

Strange Days: The Adventures of a Grumpy Rock n Roll Journalist in Los Angeles

Dean Goodman

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**NOTE: This listing is for the beta version of the eBook. It is no longer available, having been replaced by the final version. Goodreads wont let me delete**I don’t know you very well . . . It’s this coming into battle. I feel like our swords areMore**NOTE: This listing is for the beta version of the eBook. It is no longer available, having been replaced by the final version. Goodreads wont let me delete**I don’t know you very well . . . It’s this coming into battle. I feel like our swords are drawn and they got drawn quite quickly.Making friends wherever he goes — as above with Phil Collins — music journalist Dean Goodman sneaks you backstage to hang with righteous reporters, paranoid publicists, and surly stars in Strange Days: The Adventures of a Grumpy Rock n Roll Journalist in Los Angeles.Strange Days documents unusual encounters with 22 musicians and bands, from a tearful David Bowie and a gloomy Michael Hutchence to warring members of Aerosmith, the Doors, Guns N Roses and Lynyrd Skynyrd.House calls were part of Goodman’s job. He took a royal tour of the Tennessee home of Johnny and June Carter Cash—and was astounded to see that June was a hoarder. Ice-T, as all good hosts should, played him a porno clip. Mike Love was unsympathetic when his guest swallowed a fly during a tense interview. Among Goodman’s other career highlights: being emboldened by Isaac Hayes to shave his head, dancing on stage with Iggy Pop, and getting one of his biggest scoops from Sporty Spice.Underappreciated artists such as guitar icon Steve Cropper, the Velvet Underground’s John Cale and Doug Yule, and Michael Nesmith of the Monkees also get their due. Some stars weren’t able to be interviewed. One chapter centers on Ray Charles’ funeral, which was more of a raucous, all-star concert ending with a quick peek at Ray’s body.Strange Days also details the nuts-and-bolts of music journalism: deep research, the thrill of a successful interview, the agony of a disastrous one, the drudgery of transcribing the contents and turning the nuggets of wisdom into a story.Awards shows were the bane of Goodman’s existence. They allow rich and famous people to become even richer and more famous, and he was part of the problem by covering them. Strange Days recounts one such event where he innocently asked Garth Brooks about his disastrous foray into rock music as “Chris Gaines.” Brooks ripped Goodman, and the other “journalists” in the room applauded the singer.Goodman reveals that he spent his spare time preparing obituaries of people who could—or really ought to—die soon, but he is reconciled to the likelihood that one of his subjects, Charlie Sheen, will outlive him.The action is set largely during the 1990s, the last hurrah of the music industry before Napster and corporate stupidity ruined everything. It recalls a relatively innocent time when there were more than three major labels and people didn’t watch concerts through smartphones.For Goodman, the ’90s marked a second coming-of-age. He moved to the USA from his native New Zealand in 1992, after multiple viewings of Oliver Stone’s Doors movie inspired him to live like Jim Morrison on Venice Beach. That grew old after a few months, and he resumed his journalism career at Reuters, the global news agency, switching from business reporting to showbiz. He quickly got up close and personal with his rock-star heroes. For better or worse.Goodman lives in Los Angeles with his wife and memories.Read more at www.deangoodman.com and www.strangedaysbook.com.